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Parental Engagement Resources

Parental Engagement Resources

The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB Act) reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and provided a framework through which families, educators, and communities can work together to improve teaching and learning. Four principles guide this framework:

accountability for results, local control and flexibility, expanded parental choice, and effective and successful programs that reflect scientifically based research. The parental involvement provisions of Title I, Part A of the ESEA reflect these principles. Specifically, the provisions stress the following:

shared accountability between schools and parents for high student achievement, including expanded School Choice and Supplemental Educational Services for eligible children in low–performing schools, local development of parental involvement plans with sufficient flexibility to address local needs, and building parents’ capacity for using effective practices to improve their own child’s academic achievement. The new Title I, Part A is designed not only to help close the achievement gap between disadvantaged and minority students and their peers, but also to change the culture of America’s schools so that success is defined in terms of student achievement and in each school’s investment in every child. As indicated by the parental involvement provisions in Title I, Part A, the involvement of parents in their child’s education and schools is critical to that process. Former Secretary Paige put it succinctly when he stated, “Schools can’t improve without the help of parents.”

Three decades of research provide convincing evidence that parents are an important influence in helping their child achieve high academic standards. When schools collaborate with parents to help their child learn and when parents participate in school activities and decision making about their child’s education, children achieve at higher levels. In short, when parents are involved in education, children do better in school and schools improve.